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Chem 4010 Syllabus-Fall 2011

(TuTh 1:40-3:00pm Williams XXX, TuTh 3:10-5:00pm Choppin 102)

Go to MS-I (4010) Syllabus                           Go to MS-II (4011) Syllabus


MACROMOLECULAR SYSTEMS I (4 credits)

Chem 4010 Syllabus 

Catalog Description:  Macromolecular Systems I (4) Prereq. CHEM 2262 and 3491 or equivalent.

3 hours lecture; 2 hours lab. Principles of large molecules and polymeric materials; physical states, morphology, strength, processing; synthesis and biosynthesis; characterization.

Professor of Record:  Russo (chruss@lsu.edu)

Participating Professors:  Negulescu, Spivak, Cueto, Dooley, Licata, Zhang, Wu (possible guest appearances by others) 

TA:  Leah Garber  (lgarbe1@campus.lsu.edu)  Choppin 209/213

Website:  http://macro.lsu.edu/CoreCourses/MSweb4/

Grading: 

  • Homework (about 50%)
  • Quizzes & Midterm Exams (about 30%)
  • Final Exam (about 20%)
  • Total:  100%

Required Text:  As an advanced student, now is a good time to shed the notion that just one book will suffice.  You  will be required  to demonstrate that you did purchase at least one textbook appropriate for macromolecular studies.  Just navigate your browser to Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or a used book seller, and search for polymer textbooks.  If you want advice before you buy, just see me or refer to the "reference" link atop each page of this site.  No single book is perfect, so choose one that is cheap and seems to cover synthesis, analysis and a bit of processingIf you are biologically inclined, by all means look at Van Holde (any edition). Coordinate with your workgroup and choose a text that complements theirs. 

Strongly Recommended Text:  Lodge & Hiemenz 

Reserve Texts: The real secret to this course is to make good use of the books on reserve.   Over a period of time, you may wish to acquire some of these reserve texts.  The books by Flory, DeGennes, Tanford, Cantor & Schimmel and Van Holde are hard to beat.   

Course Objective: Introduce students from disparate backgrounds to the scientific challenges and technological opportunities provided by very large molecules, both synthetic and natural. The course is probably best viewed as a lecture series but with an emphasis on skills building. The successful student will become familiar with the wide variety of structures that form large molecules. He or she will be conversant in the major issues of modern macromolecular science and technology, and well prepared for additional, in-depth study of macromolecules. Students will also hone communications skills, focusing on written and technical communication. 

Grading Criteria: Students will take examinations written by the Professor of Record (Russo) jointly with other participating professors in this team-taught course. The exams will normally cover lecture and textbook material, plus problems assigned in class or laboratory. The final examination will cover the entire course.  

Communication:  This is not an official C x C course, but about 40% of the grade will be determined by communications-intensive assignments, but "communications" is broadly interpreted--reading, writing, speaking and technical/computer problems.  Most of the communications modules come as a series of assignments.  An informal assignment is followed by professor feedback and then perfected by the student.  Graduate students and Honors Students will prepare a written report or legacy lecture on an appropriate topic, selected in consultation with the faculty.  

 

MACROMOLECULAR SYSTEMS II (4 credits)

Chem 4011

Catalog  Description.  CHEM 4011 Macromolecular Systems II(4) Prereq. CHEM 4010. 3 hrs lecture; 2 hours lab. Behavior of large molecules, emphasizing theory and practice of modern and classical methods for molecular characterization.

Professor of Record:  Russo

Participating Professors:  Varies

TA:  To be determined

website:  http://macro.lsu.edu/corecourses/msweb4  

Recommended Texts:

  1. Any text by K. E. Van Holde and collaborators, e.g. Physical Biochemistry. K. E. Van Holde, Prentice-Hall, 1985. This small book, available at low cost in paperback, is clearly written.   I like the older versions best, but all of them are good.
  2. Polymer Chemistry, 2nd Edition, by Lodge and Hiemenz is also very good (CRC Press, 2007).  This book is already available on the used market for about $70.  Worth it. 
  3. A great assortment of reserve books are still on reserve

Course Objectives: In lecture, students will acquire sound knowledge of the physical methods required for macromolecular characterization. In lab, they will practice these concepts on real systems.

Grading Criteria: Students will take examinations written by the Professor of Record (Russo) jointly with other professors who may participate. The exams will normally cover lecture and textbook material, plus problems assigned in class or laboratory. The final examination will cover the entire course. Workbook assignments, integrated with lecture/lab/demo material, will be given.  Student teaching (see Teach to Learn) make up the rest of the grade.  Approximate distribution:

  • Midterm:  15%
  • Final:  15%
  • Homework Assignments:  20%
  • Legacy Development of Virtual Text:  20%
  • Real World Macromolecular Science Virtual Manuscript:  20%
  • Teach-to-Learn Mini-lectures:  10%
  • Total:  100% (with 50% of total score on communications-intensive activities)
  • Bonus:  we may have a very few unannounced quizzes for perhaps 5% bonus points. 

Working with Others:  you are encouraged to get help from me, from the TA if we have one, and through study with others in the class (but this means REAL learning, not copying answers).  You MUST certify that everything you turn in reflects what you LEARNED, not what you copied.  When something has been copied, BOTH PARTIES will lose credit. 

Special Features of the Course

Real World Macromolecular Science:  each student will select a project from a published paper and try to repeat all or a portion of that work.  Projects must meet these criteria:

  • Be approved by the student's major professor (for graduate students). 
  • Involve synthesis and characterization. 
  • Fit within our budget, or rely on supplies from a research lab. 
  • The characterization component must include: 
    •     spectroscopic characterization, as appropriate
    •     a thermodynamic method
    •     a hydrodynamic method
  • The final report will come in the form of a virtual manuscript for the ACS Journal, Macromolecules

Teach to Learn:  students will lecture for part of each week.  Sometimes, this will be a proof of a problem begun during a previous lecture, other times it will be an introductory or recap lecture.  In every case, the student must meet the professor at least one day in advance for a practice run. 

Graduate students will additionally work as a team to produce a credit-sized card with vital polymer science information, a legacy project on behalf of the MSGSA. 



Chem 4011 Syllabus-Spring 2011

(TuTh 10:40-12:00 am room TBD + We 3:10-5:00pm Choppin 138)

Course Description:  4011 Macromolecular Systems II (4) Prereq.: CHEM 4010. 3 hrs. lecture; 2 hrs. lab. Behavior of large molecules, emphasizing theory and practice of modern and classical methods for molecular characterization.

Professor of Record:  Russo (chruss@lsu.edu) Choppin 242

Partnering Professor: Pojman (john@pojman.com) Choppin 207

Other Participating Professors: Dooley, Hung, Li, Licata, Meng, Negulescu, Spivak, Wu (there is less reliance on Participating Professors relative to Chem4010). 

TA:  None

Course Objective: Introduce students to methods used to characterize macromolecules while firming up theoretical underpinnings required to understand those methods at a fundamental level. Additionally, students will acquire laboratory skills and have the opportunity to practice them in a realistic and challenging setting, often using research-grade equipment.

Recommended Text:  Polymer Chemistry 2nd edition by Hiemenz & Lodge

Required Text:  Many books cover various subjects to different levels of detail. Students will be required to demonstrate that you did purchase at least one textbook appropriate for macromolecular studies.  Just navigate your browser to Barnes & Noble, Amazon, or a used book seller, and search for polymer textbooks.  If you want advice before you buy, just see me or refer to the Reference Link. No single book is perfect, so choose one that is cheap and focuses on characterization, such as anything written by Van Holde. If you plan to specialize in a particular kind of characterization--such as electron microscopy or scattering--get a book for that. Same goes for simulations or theory; if that's going to be your area, buy something appropriate. We will have many books on library reserve and virtual textbooks are also available through the web.

Website:  http://macro.lsu.edu/CoreCourses/MSweb4/

Grading: 

1. Homework Assignments (~30%; includes questions on common labs)

2. Midterm Exam (~20 %)

3. RAP (~20%)

4. Legacy (~5%)

5. Final exam (~5 %)               

    Total:  100%

Grading Explained:

  1. Homework--Emphasis will be made on complete answers to the homework; this means written exposition of thought, not just a terse collection of answers that lead me wondering what you were thinking or what you meant to write.

  2. Midterm--Students will take a midterm exam written by the Professor of Record, possibly in conjunction with the Partnering Professor and other contributors. The exams will normally cover lecture and textbook material, plus problems assigned in class, but some questions may go beyond what is taught to assess independent thinking and creativity.

  3. RAP Project--The Repeat-a-Paper (RAP) Project will constitute most of the laboratory experience; it has these characteristics:

  •  Ideally, the paper will be suggested by your advisor or by you. I must approve it.

  • You are to repeat all or part of the paper (usually, only part of it can be done).

  • I am happy to provide suggestions if you don't come up with your own, or if your advisor demurs.

  • The paper can be polymer, biopolymer, colloid or nano.

  • The paper cannot be entirely synthesis (or isolation for biopolymers). Consistent with the nature of the class, some characterization is required.

  • A written report will take the form of a Macromolecules draft manuscript (what an author sends to the journal for review--it looks a bit different than the final published project).

  • The written part must contain all relevant sections and a fresh introduction. You can base your introduction/rationale on that in the paper itself but it cannot be plagiarized! The purpose here is to teach the difference between plagiarism and paraphrasing (preferably with insertion of your own, fresh insights).

  • A ten-minute oral presentation must be well designed and approved by Prof. Russo before you deliver it before the class.

  1. Legacy--The Legacy activities may include outreach to off-campus groups, "inreach" to on-campus groups, or a "charity begins at home" program designed to improve our environs. This will be discussed as the course progresses. It is how you contribute to making the world slightly better than you found it.

  2. Final Exam--This will test for continued progress in Macromolecular understanding, relative to Chemistry 4010.

Academic misconduct: Any forms of academic misconduct are prohibited. See the following website for the current University definition of academic misconduct: http://appl003.lsu.edu/slas/dos.nsf/$Content/Code+of+Conduct?OpenDocument

 

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